Category Archives: haunted places

Eerie Haunted Talk With Todd Bates And David Weatherly – 01/08/2020

It’s going to be a full night of Paranormal/Supernatural Conversation!

In the first hour we’ll talk to returning Haunted Voices Radio host Todd Bates about his work with paranormal investigations and extensive background with EVPs..
The second hour brings the highly accomplished David Weatherly to the show! We’ll talk about his more recent books, travels and adventures..


Todd’s Bio:
Chances are you’ll find him in a mysterious abandoned home, walls yellowed by age and doors teetering precariously on their hinges. Maybe a murder occurred or perhaps a fire. Whatever the case, Todd Bates is on the scene for a singular task: listening for voices of the dead.


Electronic Voice Phenomenon (commonly referred to as “EVP”) is spirit voices captured on a digital or analog recording device that were not heard with the naked ear at the time of their recording. For Todd, collecting this specialized evidence of paranormal origin is a life calling. After years of personally investigating the mysteries of EVP and studying under a pioneering figure in the field, Sarah Estep, he took his passion to the Internet. Now in its 13th year, HauntedVoices.com has quickly grown to be one of the most successful Electronic Voice Phenomenon-based websites on the Internet dedicated to research, education and discussion. The site is also the home to the Haunted Voices Radio. The network of live & archived programs provide audio material 24 hours a day and Todd acts as program director and its flagship talk show host.
Todd has collected some of the most impressive examples of the phenomenon available today and currently teaches his capturing techniques and paranormal investigation protocol via private and on-air lessons.

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Todd Bates in the Media
Due to Todd Bates’ research and high profile presence as a radio talk show host, he has evolved into one of very few EVP authorities and is in demand to provides advice, education, and EVP analysis to paranormal investigation groups worldwide. The media community has taken notice, too. With paranormal subject matter finding a regular home in mainstream media, experts such as Todd Bates are in high demand. Todd has made several radio, TV, and public appearances to both share his knowledge and create guidelines for demonstrating EVP.

Television: Adviser for “A Haunting” on the Discovery Channel (“Sallies House” episode); WTHI TV (CBS affiliate) “The Ashmore Experiment” 2 day event. Appeared on WTWO (NBC Affiliate).

Image may contain: Todd Bates, smiling, standing, possible text that says 'TODD BATES VOCAL TALENT YOUR NEXT DOOR VOICE... SIMPLIFIED'

Radio: Before founding his own radio network, Todd’s radio hosting career began with Dr. Ed Craft of Magick Mind Radio (An IBC Network Program). He was offered a co-host spot with Dr. Jimmy Lowery of “Alabama Para Spiritual Radio” (APSR Radio) and was then given the opportunity to host his own live show on the BBS Radio Network where he discussed all topics paranormal. He has since guessed on The Man Cow Show, WTAY FM, WTYE AM Crawford County, IL, WZPL 99.5 Indianapolis, IN, X-zone Radio, Voice of America, and The Jeff Rense Show.

Each has been a valuable experience to share his vast knowledge of EVP. Todd is a graduate of the American Broadcasting School, where he specialized in voice-overs, and radio broadcasting. Todd is currently working on his BA in Mass Communications at Ashford University and General Manager of WGOG Digital Broadcasting in Clearwater, FL
Public Speaking: Because of his specialty within the paranormal community, Todd is an in-demand speaker at conferences and conventions nationwide including a yearly showing at GhostFest Expo, held on the infamously haunted RMS Queen Mary historic ship.
Software Development: Once only a beta tester for Adobe Systems (maker of Photoshop), he has been tapped to assist in creating features that will specifically aid Electronic Voice Phenomenon research in future revisions to its industry standard audio editing program, Audition.


Links:
www.letstalkradio.net
https://www.facebook.com/hauntedvoices/
https://www.facebook.com/hauntedvoicesradio


David Weatherly

About David Weatherly:
DAVID WEATHERLY is a renaissance man of the strange and supernatural. He has traveled the world in pursuit of ghosts, cryptids, UFOs, magic and more. From the specters of dusty castles, to remote, haunted islands, from ancient sites, to modern mysteries, he has journeyed to the most unusual places on the globe seeking the unknown. David became fascinated with the paranormal at a young age. Ghost stories and accounts of weird creatures and UFOs led him to discover many of his early influences. Writers such as such as John Keel, Jacques Vallee, Hans Holzer and others set him on course to spend his life exploring and investigating the unexplained.

Throughout his life, he’s also delved into shamanic and magical traditions from around the world, spending time with elders from numerous cultures in Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia. He has studied with Taoist masters in China, Tibetan Lamas, and other mystics from the far east. He’s picked up knowledge from African and Native American tribal elders and sat around fires with shaman from countless other traditions.

Along his path, David has also gathered a lot of arcane knowledge, studying a range of ancient arts from palmistry, the runes, and other obscure forms of divination to alchemy and magick. He has studied and taught Qigong and Ninjutsu as well as various energy related arts. David has also studied stage and performance magic. His shamanic and magical background has given him a unique perspective in his explorations into the unknown, and he continues to write, travel and explore, leaving no stone unturned in his quest for the strange and unusual.

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David’s Amazon Page


David has investigated, and written about, a diverse range of topics including,: Hauntings, Cryptozoology, Ufology, Ancient Mysteries, Shamanism, Magic and Psychic Phenomena. In 2012, David founded the independent media and publishing company, Leprechaun Productions. He has been a featured speaker at conferences around the world and has lectured for countless paranormal, UFO, and spiritual groups.

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He is a frequent guest on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory, Darkness Radio and other radio programs. David has also appeared on numerous television shows including Ancient Aliens, Mysteries at the National Parks and Beyond Belief. David’s books include Strange Intruders, Black Eyed Children and the Wood Knocks and Haunted series.


Links:
https://www.facebook.com/Eerie-Lights-282573662660073/
https://www.facebook.com/david.weatherly.31
https://eerielights.com/

Christmas Ghost Stories on Mystic Moon Cafe 12/25/2019

This year, we decided that we would invite you all to help us resurrect an old, forgotten Christmas tradition of telling Christmas/Holiday ghost stories.

You can tell them live, pre-record if you won’t have time to share on Christmas Day, get a written copy for one of our hosts to read, or just listen…maybe join in the chat..

If we don’t get the chance between now and then, Merry Christmas to you all!

7:00 pm Pacific, 9:00 pm Central, 10:00 pm Eastern!



Ghosts, Critters & Sacred Places With Jeff Davis | Dec. 18, 2019

Join us on December 18th as we speak with Jefferson Davis – No, not THAT Jefferson Davis… This one is an author, historian, paranormal investigator, world traveler, and more!

Tune in at 7:00 pm Pacific, 9:00 pm Central, 10:00 pm Eastern!


About Jeff Davis

Jeff Davis has lived in the Peculiar World for most of his life. As a boy, he decided to become an archaeologist and investigate the odd and unusual after watching the original Mummy movie with Boris Karloff.

For many years, Jeff worked in the woods of Pacific Northwest’s Cascade Mountains, the home of Bigfoot. Jeff has encountered many peculiar things while traveling around the world, visiting England, Italy, Bosnia, South Korea, Japan, and Southwest Asia.

Jeff has written, edited, or contributed to over a dozen books, including military history and the paranormal. Some of his books include Weird Washington and Weird Oregon. He has been a guest on Coast to Coast AM, Haunted History, Ghost Adventures, and The Dead Files.

http://www.ghostsandcritters.com/aboutjeffdavis.html


Jeff Davis: A Longer, Somewhat Boring Biography

Jefferson Davis

Jeff Davis was born in Vancouver, Washington and grew up in the Army, so to speak. Jeff’s father was stationed at the Vancouver Barracks and Jeff grew up playing in and around the barracks. This led to his interest in a military career. This competed with his other interests, ghosts, mythology, and archaeology, which began when he spent many evenings watching old horror movies, such as the original Mummy with Boris Karloff.

Ghosts and Critters Career

Jeff was interested in the paranormal since childhood, but because of job and military commitments, was limited to short investigations and research projects. However, in the late 1990s, during a lull in work and military assignments, Jeff published his first book, Ghosts and Strange Critters of the Pacific Northwest. He wrote this book, and his later manuscripts with a focus on the historical context of hauntings, the who, what, where, and WHY a location might be haunted. Because of his anthropology background, and a natural suspicion of the government, Jeff was also interested in mysteries and conspiracy theories, strange animals, and forgotten facts. He included those in his books as well.

Jeff has written, edited, or contributed to over a dozen books on military history, and the paranormal. Some of these books include, Weird Washington, Weird Oregon, A Haunted Tour Guide to the Pacific Northwest, Ghosts, Critters and Sacred Place of Washington and Oregon, Volumes I – III, and many others. He has been a guest on Coast to Coast AM; and, the History Channel series, Haunted History. Jeff has also been a four-time guest expert on the Travel Channel show, The Dead Files, and two-time guest on Ghost Adventures.

Television Show Appearances

Haunted History was a UFA/Cafe Productions series exploring the supernatural. The American version of the show also debuted in 1998 (as a special) with the same premise of exploring the world to investigate the “haunted history” of reportedly haunted locations. Jeff was the historical consultant and witness for the episode, Northwest.

Haunted History: [Pacific] Northwest, Season 2, Episode 3, air date 2 March 2001.

Locations visited:

  • White Eagle Saloon (Tavern), Albina, Portland, Oregon
  • Manresa Castle Hotel, Port Townsend, Washington
  • The Underground, Seattle, Washington
  • Vancouver Barracks, Vancouver, Washington
  • Heceta Head Lighthouse, Heceta House Bed & Breakfast, Yachats, Oregon

The Dead Files is an American paranormal television series that premiered on September 23, 2011 on Travel Channel. The program features psychic medium, Amy Allan, and former NYPD homicide detective, Steve DiSchiavi, as they investigate locations that are reported to be haunted.

The Dead Files Episodes

Final Curtain Call: Season 2, Episode 5, air date 18 May 2012. Amy and Steve travel to Vancouver, Washington to investigate reports of frightening paranormal activity at the historic Victorian-era Slocum House Theater, which was the oldest community theater in the area. Amy discovers secrets hiding in the dark corners that include the spirits of children and the ghost of Laura Slocum inhabits the theater, especially when children visitors are present. Jeff was a historic witness/consultant for this episode.

House of Mirrors: Season 6, Episode 3, air date 9 May 2015. Amy and Steve head to Oregon when a man calls desperate for help due to bizarre activity in his home, his partner and son are also victims of the more malevolent activity that occurs in the home. Steve’s research details the past events that had occurred on the land where the property currently sits and Amy’s walk involves sinister entities referred to as “Tricksters” whom seem to have a diabolical purpose for the residents. Jeff was a historic expert for this episode.

The Whispering: Season 7, Episode 12, air date 18 June 2016. Steve and Amy investigate a woman’s claims that the activity in her Concrete, WA, home will kill her. Steve unearths the genocide of a local Indian tribe, while Amy encounters a powerful energy barrier constructed by the dead. Jeff was a historic expert for this episode.

While the Children Sleep: Season 8, Episode 7, air date 5 August 2017. A mother claims malicious paranormal activity is directed at her children and elderly mother. Steve learns of a deadly explosion that killed nearly a dozen people, and Amy encounters a vengeful murder victim. Jeff was a historic expert for this episode.

Ghost Adventures is an American television series about the paranormal that premiered on October 17, 2008, on Travel Channel. Produced by MY-Tupelo Entertainment, the program follows ghost hunters (Zak Bagans, Nick Groff (until season 10), and Aaron Goodwin) as they investigate locations that are reported to be haunted. The show is introduced and narrated by Zak Bagans.

Ghost Adventures Episodes

During Season 16, on all four Saturdays of October, 2018, the Ghost Adventures show aired a four-part mini series filmed in and around Astoria, Oregon. Behind the scenes, Jeff helped located venues and witnesses for each episode. He appeared in two of the episodes as a historic consultant.

Graveyard of the Pacific: Commander’s House: Located in Warrenton, Oregon, aired 20 October 2018. Zak and the crew continue their investigation of the Graveyard of the Pacific at a former military installation near Astoria, Oregon, that’s haunted by a tragic past and home to an aggressive entity.

Graveyard of the Pacific: Cape Disappointment: Located in Ilwaco, Washington, aired 27 October 2018. Zak and the crew conclude their investigation of the Graveyard of the Pacific with a visit to Washington State, where they explore a lighthouse that bore witness to some of the most tragic shipwrecks on the Pacific Coast.

Military Career

While still in high school, Jeff joined the US Army Reserves and spent 32 years in the US Army and Army Reserves. He started off as a private in the infantry and went on to serve three years on active duty. He spent 18 months in Italy, where he helped guard nuclear weapons and the other 18 months at Ft. Lewis, WA, where he served with the 9th Infantry Division. While there, his less pleasant job was as the gunner of a 90mm recoilless rifle. After his three-year hitch, Jeff went to college, went through ROTC, and received a commission along with his Bachelor’s degree.

Jeff ‘branched’ military intelligence and served with several units in the National Guard and Army Reserves. He went on overseas training missions to Japan and Korea, and eventually was mobilized and sent to Bosnia. In Bosnia, he served as a Civil Affairs officer. His most worthwhile duty was organizing a troop of soldiers who volunteered to put on puppet shows for Bosnian orphans in their off-duty hours.

After Bosnia, Jeff received assignments as a military historian. After September 11th, he was mobilized twice as a military historian. He spent most of this time in Southwest Asia and Florida. His duties included conducting interviews with Special Operations forces and writing reports on their actions. After his mobilizations, Jeff became historian for the 104th Division, of the Army Reserves, and unofficial army historian for the Vancouver Barracks. He eventually retired with the rank of Major after 32 years of military service.

Archaeology and Historic Preservation Career

Jeff received a BS in Anthropology from Portland State University, in Portland, Oregon. Between Army and Army Reserve work, Jeff worked for several years as an archaeologist. He worked at the Mt. St. Helen’s National Volcanic Monument, the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Mt. Hood National Forest, Umatilla National Forest, and Boise National Forest.

In the 1990s, Jeff lived in England for nearly a year while he studied archaeology at the University of Sheffield. He eventually received a MA in Archaeology and Prehistory, after completing his thesis on the Vikings in Greenland.

Following his several mobilizations during the global war on terrorism, Jeff did not return to archaeology as a full-time job. Instead, he concentrated on the military history and heritage of the Vancouver Barracks and the Pacific Northwest. He and others formed the Vancouver Barracks Military Association (VBMA). Jeff combines his love of military history, the Vancouver Barracks, and the paranormal by giving regular Spirit Tours of the Vancouver Barracks.

Books on the Paranormal

Ghosts and Strange Critters of Washington and Oregon, Norseman Ventures Publishing

Ghosts Critters and Sacred Places of Washington and Oregon I (Revised) Norseman Ventures Publishing

Ghosts Critters and Sacred Places of Washington and Oregon II Norseman Ventures Publishing

Ghosts Critters and Sacred Places of Washington and Oregon III Norseman Ventures Publishing

Haunted Astoria (Revised) Norseman Ventures Publishing

Haunted Tour Guide to the Pacific Northwest, with Janine Davis (Revised) Norseman Ventures Publishing

Portland Rose City Ghosts Volume I Norseman Ventures Publishing

Vancouver USA Ghosts, Volume I Norseman Ventures Publishing

Weird England, Sterling Publishing. Jeff contributed two stories to this book.

Weird Hauntings, I contributed three stories to this book.

Weird Oregon, Sterling Publishing. Jeff co-authored this book, which mixes the unique history of Oregon State with its oddities, and significant people places and things.

Weird Washington, Sterling Publishing. Jeff wrote nine (9) of the 12 chapters in this book, of true stories of the odd, unusual, and unique heritage of Washington State. I focused on many places with archaeological and historic appeal. The Washington State Librarian recommended it for educators teaching introductory classes in Washington State History.

Archaeology and History Books

1995, A Macrobotanical Analysis of the Remains from the Middens of the Norse Greenland Farm Complex of Sandnes (v51) Unpublished master’s thesis, submitted to the University of Sheffield, UK. This document was a mix of historic research using translated documents, archaeological reports, as well as laboratory analysis to try to find what happened to the Norse settlers who disappeared from Greenland in the Middle Ages

1995, Nothing in Hell…The Story of the 104th Division Timberwolves in World War II. Unpublished manuscript, submitted to the Commander, 104th Division, Vancouver Barracks, WA, January 1996.

2011, History of the 75th Division 1943 – 2012 (Revised). Jeff was the principal author of several chapters detailing the history of this US Army unit, and edited chapters from the previous edition.

2014, Custer’s Other Brother-in-Law, the Fred Calhoun Log Book. (Editor) This is a copy of a 19th century book kept by Lieutenant Frederick Calhoun. He was stationed at the Vancouver Barracks for several years. It includes a bio of Calhoun, and overview of his life and times.

(In progress)- Custer’s Niece, the Household Account Book of Emma Reed Calhoun. This book is an annotated copy 19th century account book kept by Mrs. Frederick Calhoun. She was G. A. Custer’s niece, and married Calhoun after the Battle of Little Bighorn. She and her husband were stationed at the Vancouver Barracks for several years. It includes an overview of her life and in what was the western frontier.

Ghostober Recap | Nov. 13, 2019

On the next episode of Mystic Moon Cafe, Wendy, June and Jake will recap the ghostly shenanigans from October. This includes such fun topics as:

  • Ghost hunting reality TV shows
  • Ghost hunts
  • Paranormal events

There could be some smack talking about the TV shows. Which ones will we cover? Glad you asked.

  • Ghost Adventures: Serial Killer Spirits
  • Ghost Adventures Halloween Special: The Conjuring House
  • Haunted Salem: Live
  • The Holzer Files
  • Destination Fear
  • Ghost Nation
  • Ghost Hunters (2019)
  • The World’s Biggest Ghost Hunt

After that, June and Jake will talk about their latest ghost hunting and paranormal events, like J&M Cafe in Pioneer Square (Seattle) and the Port Gamble Ghost Conference.

This is going to be a fun, not-so-serious two hours of paranormality!

Pete Orbea & Port Gamble Paranormal Conference | Oct. 30, 2019

Video of the Interview

The night before Halloween, Wendy and June interview Pete Orbea about Port Gamble’s famous haunts and his psychic readings. Tune in on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019 at 10 PM ET for the full scoop.


Show’s Audio Recording:

About Pete Orbea

Pete Orbea gives a ghost tour in Port Gamble, WA

Pete Orbea works in the historic town of Port Gamble. He leads ghost walks and special investigations and coordinates the Port Gamble Ghost Conference. This has provided the opportunity to develop his skills for communicating with spirits and investigating the paranormal.

Pete became interested in the paranormal when he was 7 after witnessing two Native American warriors appear and vanish while on a road trip in northern Arizona. His interest piqued again during college while working at the Egyptian Theater in Boise, ID, a hotspot for paranormal activity.

While living in Port Gamble and getting to know others with similar interests, Pete felt at home in the haunted historic town. After joining the Olympic Peninsula Paranormal Society in 2013, he started to realize that he could speak with spirits.

pete orbea port gamble interview october 30, 2019
Haunted Walker-Ames House, Port Gamble, WA

He’s also very proud to be a member of the Extended Research Team of PRI (Paranormal Research & Investigations) as a Researcher/Investigator. Currently, Pete helps people through psychic readings and investigations in Kitsap County.


About Port Gamble Paranormal Conference

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A three day conference (Nov. 8-Nov. 10, 2019) with classes, panel discussions, tours and investigations of the paranormal in Port Gamble, WA. 

Investigations are $10/ea (Walker-Ames/Masonic Lodge $20, Limit 16 people per investigation time slot). Tickets may be purchased online, or at the Conference Registrations Table during conference hours and will be served on a first-come, first-serve basis. 

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Classes are $15/ea. Tickets may be purchased online, or at the Conference Registration Table during conference hours.  

Daytime activities including speakers and most classes will be held at The Point Casino & Hotel. For conference questions, call Port Gamble Weddings & Events at 360-297-8074.

Wendy’s Magickal Studies – Appalachian Folk Magic, Lore & Healing 09/22/2019

Teaser Trailer

For this segment, Wendy will be talking with good friends, Denise Pridemore and Jen Smith, both of who have Appalachian family with strong leanings towards Folk Magics, Healing, and Lore. I’ve been doing my homework as well, so this should be an enlightening show!

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7:00 pm Pacific, 9:00 pm Central, 11:00 pm Eastern!


Listen Here:

Listen to “Appalachian Folk Magic, Lore, Healings & Granny Magic” on Spreaker.

Now, I’m no expert in any of these things, but I know what I enjoy. Research and Learning are at the top of my list. I will be delving into one aspect of Magic, Witchcraft, Folklore, Myth and/or Legend in each article.

So, if you are so inclined, join me on this journey of discovery!



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‘American Witchcraft’

The people who have called The Appalachian Mountains their home over the centuries and beyond are a mish-mash of the Native American Indian tribes – Shawnee, Cherokee, Creek and Delaware, just to name a few. Added in later were settlers from Ireland, Scotland, Germany, and more. When you mix in all of these different peoples. cultures and traditions – not to mention adding in ancient lore of the people brought in as Slaves – and blood, sweat, tears and deaths of those just trying to carve out a little niche in the world, you come up with the recipe for some powerful beliefs, magics, healing practices and downright scary – sometimes – ‘wise ones’..

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Appalachian Folk Magic – Graveyard dirt, ocre, cascarilla, bones, lodestone, hoodoo, witchcraft

I’ve run across the term ‘Granny Magic’ in several different articles and websites, and really get a kick out of the term. However, I feel it’s not really accurate since gender isn’t really the heart of the practitioners these days. But the traditions are definitely passed down from great-grandparents, grandparents, and on down the line. The Ancients and Ancestors are key elements of the rootwork, healings, conjurings and so on.


Anyway, this should be a very interesting and informative segment, so please join us!

Full Harvest Moon, Mabon & The Musings Of An Eclectic Witch – 09/15/2019

On this episode of Wendy’s Magickal Studies, I will be talking about the gorgeous Harvest Moon as well as the Pagan Mabon/Harvest Home/Autumnal Equinox due to my Eclectic guest not feeling up to doing a talk at this time. Wishing her more good days!

7:00 pm Pacific, 9:00 pm Central, 11:00 pm Eastern!

Listen Here:

Player will go to the show as soon as we go ‘Live’

Now, I’m no expert in any of these things, but I know what I enjoy. Research and Learning are at the top of my list. I will be delving into one aspect of Magic, Witchcraft, Folklore, Myth and/or Legend in each article.
So, if you are so inclined, join me on this journey of discovery!


Eclectic Witch: A witch that embraces all types of magic and magical traditions, refusing to be pinned down to one type of magical practice.


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The Full Harvest Moon on Friday, September 13th, 2019

The Spiritual Meaning Of The 2019 Harvest Moon Is About Releasing Yourself From The Past
This is the season that starts a slow, patient process of death after a vibrant and burgeoning summer. However, this death is not the end. It’s about shedding skin, letting go, and cleansing yourself from deep within so you can prepare for a swift rebirth. The veil is thinning and the spiritual meaning of the 2019 Harvest Moon will help you dig into your heart and discover what truly lies there.

Taking place on Sept. 14 at 12:32 a.m. ET (Friday the 13th, for most of the United States), the Harvest Moon always happens nearest to the autumn equinox. According to TimeAndDate.com, this full moon marked the moment your ancient ancestors collected their crops and began storing them away for the impending winter. Spiritually speaking, the Harvest Moon is all about taking stock of your emotional and physical well-being, helping you come to terms with the results of the decisions you’ve made so far. After that, it’s about understanding what you could have done differently, forgive yourself for your mistakes, and decide that you’ll learn from them.
Source: https://www.elitedaily.com/p/the-spiritual-meaning-of-the-2019-harvest-moon-is-about-releasing-yourself-from-the-past-18749391


Mabon
Autumn Equinox, 2nd Harvest, Falls Between September 21 – 23

Mabon, (pronounced MAY-bun, MAY-bone, MAH-boon, or MAH-bawn) is the Autumn Equinox. The Autumn Equinox divides the day and night equally, and we all take a moment to pay our respects to the impending dark. We also give thanks to the waning sunlight, as we store our harvest of this year’s crops. The Druids call this celebration, Mea’n Fo’mhair, and honor the The Green Man, the God of the Forest, by offering libations to trees. Offerings of ciders, wines, herbs and fertilizer are appropriate at this time. Wiccans celebrate the aging Goddess as she passes from Mother to Crone, and her consort the God as he prepares for death and re-birth.

The Goddess at Mabon

Various other names for this Lesser Wiccan Sabbat are The Second Harvest Festival, Wine Harvest, Feast of Avalon, Equinozio di Autunno (Strega), Alben Elfed (Caledonii), or Cornucopia. The Teutonic name, Winter Finding, spans a period of time from the Sabbat to Oct. 15th, Winter’s Night, which is the Norse New Year.

At this festival it is appropriate to wear all of your finery and dine and celebrate in a lavish setting. It is the drawing to and of family as we prepare for the winding down of the year at Samhain. It is a time to finish old business as we ready for a period of rest, relaxation, and reflection.
Source: https://wicca.com/celtic/akasha/mabon.htm

From Mike Nichol’s The Witches Sabbats’  http://www.witchessabbats.com/site/index.php

HARVEST HOME

There were three men came out of the West,

Their fortunes for to try,

And these three men made a solemn vow,

John Barleycorn must die….

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Photo by: http://kitchenwiccan.com/mabon-autumn-equinox-or-harvest-home/

Despite the bad publicity generated by Thomas Tryon’s novel, Harvest Home is the pleasantest of holidays. Admittedly, it does involve the concept of sacrifice, but one that is symbolic only. The sacrifice is that of the spirit of vegetation, John Barleycorn. Occurring one quarter of the year after Midsummer, Harvest Home represents midautumn, autumn’s height. It is also the autumnal equinox, one of the quarter days of the year, a Lesser Sabbat and a Low Holiday in modern Witchcraft. Recently, some Pagan groups have begun calling the holiday by the Welsh name ‘Mabon’, although there seems little historical justification for doing so.

Technically, an equinox is an astronomical point and, due to the fact that our leap-year cycle causes dates to slip and then snap back into place, the date may vary by a few days depending on the year. The autumnal equinox occurs when the sun crosses the equator on its apparent journey southward, and we experience a day and a night that are of equal duration. Up until Harvest Home, the hours of daylight have been greater than the hours from dusk to dawn. But from now on, the reverse holds true. Astrologers know this as the date on which the sun enters the sign of Libra, the Scales (an appropriate symbol of a balanced day and night).

The Witches' Sabbats by [Nichols, Mike, Wren Walker]

However, since most European peasants were not accomplished at calculating the exact date of the equinox, they celebrated the event on a fixed calendar date, September 25, a holiday the medieval church Christianized under the name of “Michaelmas”, the feast of the archangel Michael. (One wonders if, at some point, the Roman Catholic Church contemplated assigning the four quarter days of the year to the four archangels, just as they assigned the four cross-quarter days to the four Gospel writers. Further evidence for this may be seen in the fact that there was a brief flirtation with calling the vernal equinox “Gabrielmas”, ostensibly to commemorate the archangel Gabriel’s announcement to Mary on Lady Day.)

Again, it must be remembered that the Celts reckoned their days from sundown to sundown, so the September 25 festivities actually begin on the previous sundown (our September 24). Although our Pagan ancestors probably celebrated Harvest Home on September 25, modern Witches and Pagans, with their desktop computers for making finer calculations, seem to prefer the actual equinox point, beginning the celebration on its eve.

Mythically, this is the day of the year when the God of Light is defeated by his twin and alter ego, the God of Darkness. It is the time of the year when night conquers day. And as I have recently shown in my seasonal reconstruction of the Welsh myth of Blodeuwedd, the autumnal equinox is the only day of the whole year when Llew (light) is vulnerable and it is possible to defeat him. Llew now stands on the Balance (Libra/ autumnal equinox), with one foot on the Cauldron (Cancer/summer solstice) and his other foot on the Goat (Capricorn/winter solstice). Thus he is betrayed by Blodeuwedd, the Virgin (Virgo) and transformed into an Eagle (Scorpio).

Two things are now likely to occur mythically, in rapid succession. Having defeated Llew, Goronwy (darkness) now takes over Llew’s functions, both as lover to Blodeuwedd, the Goddess, and as king of our own world. Although Goronwy, the Horned King, now sits on Llew’s throne and begins his rule immediately, his formal coronation will not be for another six weeks, occurring at Samhain (Halloween) or the beginning of winter, when he becomes the Winter Lord, the Dark King, Lord of Misrule. Goronwy’s other function has more immediate results, however. He mates with the Virgin Goddess, and Blodeuwedd conceives, and will give birth—nine months later (at the summer solstice)—to Goronwy’s son, who is really another incarnation of himself, the Dark Child.

Llew’s sacrificial death at Harvest Home also identifies him with John Barleycorn, spirit of the fields. Thus, Llew represents not only the sun’s power, but also the sun’s life trapped and crystallized in the corn. Often this corn spirit was believed to reside most especially in the last sheaf or shock harvested, which was dressed in fine clothes, or woven into a wicker-like man-shaped form. This effigy was then cut and carried from the field, and usually burned, amidst much rejoicing. So one may see Blodeuwedd and Goronwy in a new guise, not as conspirators who murder their king, but as kindly farmers who harvest the crop that they had planted and so lovingly cared for. And yet, anyone who knows the old ballad of John Barleycorn knows that we have not heard the last of him.

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They let him stand till midsummer’s day,

Till he looked both pale and wan,

And little Sir John’s grown a long, long beard

And so become a man….

Incidentally, this annual mock sacrifice of a large wickerwork figure (representing the vegetation spirit) may have been the origin of the misconception that Druids made human sacrifices. This charge was first made by Julius Caesar (who may not have had the most unbiased of motives), and has been restated many times since. However, as has often been pointed out, the only historians besides Caesar who make this accusation are those who have read Caesar. And, in fact, upon reading Caesar’s Gallic Wars closely, one discovers that Caesar never claims to have actually witnessed such a sacrifice. Nor does he claim to have talked to anyone else who did. In fact, there is not one single eyewitness account of a human sacrifice performed by Druids in all of history!

Nor is there any archaeological evidence to support the charge. If, for example, human sacrifices had been performed at the same ritual sites year after year, there would be physical traces. Yet there is not a scrap. Nor is there any native tradition or history that lends support. In fact, insular tradition seems to point in the opposite direction. The Druid’s reverence for life was so strict that they refused to lift a sword to defend themselves when massacred by Roman soldiers on the Isle of Mona. Irish brehon laws forbade a Druid to touch a weapon, and any soul rash enough to unsheathe a sword in the presence of a Druid would be executed for such an outrage!

Four Hallows

Jesse Weston, in her brilliant study of the Four Hallows of British myth, “From Ritual to Romance”, points out that British folk tradition is, however, full of mock sacrifices. In the case of the wicker man, such figures were referred to in very personified terms, dressed in clothes, addressed by name, etc. In such a religious ritual drama, everybody played along.

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John Barleycorn Effigy

They’ve hired men with scythes so sharp,

To cut him off at the knee,

They’ve rolled him and tied him by the waist

Serving him most barbarously….

In the medieval miracle-play tradition of the “Rise Up, Jock” variety (performed by troupes of mummers at all the village fairs), a young harlequin-like king always underwent a mock sacrificial death. But invariably, the traditional cast of characters included a mysterious “Doctor” who had learned many secrets while “traveling in foreign lands”. The Doctor reaches into his bag of tricks, plies some magical cure, and presto! the young king rises up hale and whole again, to the cheers of the crowd. As Weston so sensibly points out, if the young king were actually killed, he couldn’t very well rise up again, which is the whole point of the ritual drama! It is an enactment of the death and resurrection of the vegetation spirit. And what better time to perform it than at the end of the harvest season!

In the rhythm of the year, Harvest Home marks a time of rest after hard work. The crops are gathered in, and winter is still a month and a half away! Although the nights are getting cooler, the days are still warm, and there is something magical in the sunlight, for it seems silvery and indirect. As we pursue our gentle hobbies of making corn dollies (those tiny vegetation spirits) and wheat weaving, our attention is suddenly arrested by the sound of baying from the skies (the “Hounds of Annwn” passing?), as lines of geese cut silhouettes across a harvest moon. And we move closer to the hearth, the longer evening hours giving us time to catch up on our reading, munching on popcorn balls and caramel apples and sipping home-brewed mead or ale. What a wonderful time Harvest Home is! And how lucky we are to live in a part of the country where the season’s changes are so dramatic and majestic!

And little Sir John in the nut-brown bowl–

And he’s brandy in the glass,

And little Sir John in the nut-brown bowl

Proved the strongest man at last.

The Legend of John Barleycorn

In English folklore, John Barleycorn is a character who represents the crop of barley harvested each autumn. Equally as important, he symbolizes the wonderful drinks which can be made from barley — beer and whiskey — and their effects. In the traditional folksong, John Barleycorn, the character of John Barleycorn endures all kinds of indignities, most of which correspond to the cyclic nature of planting, growing, harvesting, and then death.

Although written versions of the song date back to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, there is evidence that it was sung for years before that. There are a number of different versions, but the most well-known one is the Robert Burns version, in which John Barleycorn is portrayed as an almost Christ-like figure, suffering greatly before finally dying so that others may live.

In The Golden Bough, Sir James Frazer cites John Barleycorn as proof that there was once a Pagan cult in England that worshipped a god of vegetation, who was sacrificed in order to bring fertility to the fields. This ties into the related story of the Wicker Man, who is burned in effigy. Ultimately, the character of John Barleycorn is a metaphor for the spirit of grain, grown healthy and hale during the summer, chopped down and slaughtered in his prime, and then processed into beer and whiskey so he can live once more.

Beer in glass and barley

The lyrics to the Robert Burns version of the song are as follows:

There was three kings into the east,
three kings both great and high,
and they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn must die.

They took a plough and plough’d him down,
put clods upon his head,
and they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn was dead.

But the cheerful Spring came kindly on’
and show’rs began to fall.
John Barleycorn got up again,
and sore surprised them all.

The sultry suns of Summer came,
and he grew thick and strong;
his head well arm’d wi’ pointed spears,
that no one should him wrong.

The sober Autumn enter’d mild,
when he grew wan and pale;
his bendin’ joints and drooping head
show’d he began to fail.

His colour sicken’d more and more,
and he faded into age;
and then his enemies began
to show their deadly rage.

They took a weapon, long and sharp,
and cut him by the knee;
they ty’d him fast upon a cart,
like a rogue for forgerie.

They laid him down upon his back,
and cudgell’d him full sore.
they hung him up before the storm,
and turn’d him o’er and o’er.

They filled up a darksome pit
with water to the brim,
they heav’d in John Barleycorn.
There, let him sink or swim!

They laid him upon the floor,
to work him farther woe;
and still, as signs of life appear’d,
they toss’d him to and fro.

They wasted o’er a scorching flame
the marrow of his bones;
but a miller us’d him worst of all,
for he crush’d him between two stones.

And they hae taen his very hero blood
and drank it round and round;
and still the more and more they drank,
their joy did more abound.

John Barleycorn was a hero bold,
of noble enterprise;
for if you do but taste his blood,
’twill make your courage rise.

‘Twill make a man forget his woe;
’twill heighten all his joy;
’twill make the widow’s heart to sing,
tho the tear were in her eye.

Then let us toast John Barleycorn,
each man a glass in hand;
and may his great posterity
ne’er fail in old Scotland!

Source:   https://solitarywitchin.wordpress.com/2015/07/07/the-legend-of-john-barleycorn/

Spirits And Echoes Of The 1910 Wellington Train Tragedy – 09/11/2019

In this episode, Jake, June and Wendy will be talking with Medea Aguiar and Karen Frazier, both of whom are Paranormal Investigators who along with our own June Nixon, have extensively researched and investigated the site – Karen even wrote a book about it – of the deadliest train disaster in History, killing at least 96 and injuring so many more..

Listen Here:


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Photo courtesy of Museum of History & Industry, #1995.51.9, J.A. Juleen photographer, circa 1910

7:00 pm Pacific, 9:00 pm Central, 10:00 pm Eastern!


A bit about the Wellington Train Disaster:
Read the entire Article from HistoryLink.org here: https://historylink.org/File/5127

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Photo courtesy of Museum of History & Industry, #1995.51.3, J.A. Juleen photographer, circa 1910 https://www.blackdiamondnow.net/black-diamond-now/2014/02/the-wellington-avalanche-railroading-disaster-circa-1910.html

During the early morning hours of March 1, 1910, an avalanche roars down Windy Mountain near Stevens Pass in the Cascade Mountains, taking with it two Great Northern trains and 96 victims. This is one of the worst train disasters in U.S. history and the worst natural disaster (with the greatest number of fatalities) in Washington.

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Photo courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, #CUR718, Asahel Curtis photographer, circa 1910


On February 23, 1910, after a snow delay at the east Cascade Mountains town of Leavenworth, two Great Northern trains, the Spokane Local passenger train No. 25 and Fast Mail train No. 27, proceeded westbound towards Puget Sound. There were five or six steam and electric engines, 15 boxcars, passenger cars, and sleepers.

Wellington disaster: entrance to Cascade Tunnel, 1910
Photo by Asahel Curtis, Courtesy UW Special Collections (17477)

The trains had passed through the Cascade Tunnel from the east to the west side of the mountains, when snow and avalanches forced them to stop near Wellington, in King County. Wellington was a small town populated almost entirely with Great Northern railway employees.

The train stopped under the peak of Windy Mountain, above Tye Creek. Heavy snowfall and avalanches made it impossible for train crews to clear the tracks. For six days, the trains waited in blizzard and avalanche conditions. On February 26, the telegraph lines went down and communication with the outside was lost. On the last day of February, the weather turned to rain with thunder and lightning. Thunder shook the snow-laden Cascade Mountains alive with avalanches. Then it happened.

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Wellington disaster: the remains of the rotary snowplow, 1910
Photo by Asahel Curtis, Courtesy UW Special Collections (17467)

White Death

On March 1, some time after midnight, Charles Andrews, a Great Northern employee, was walking towards the warmth of one of the Wellington’s bunkhouses when he heard a rumble. He turned toward the sound. In 1960, he described what he witnessed:

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Roger’s Pass Avalanche, Wellington, WA Train Tragedy 1910

“White Death moving down the mountainside above the trains. Relentlessly it advanced, exploding, roaring, rumbling, grinding, snapping — a crescendo of sound that might have been the crashing of ten thousand freight trains. It descended to the ledge where the side tracks lay, picked up cars and equipment as though they were so many snow-draped toys, and swallowing them up, disappeared like a white, broad monster into the ravine below” (Roe, 88).
One of the 23 survivors interviewed three days after the Wellington train disaster stated:

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Wellington disaster: Bringing the bodies to Wellington, 1910 Photo by Asahel Curtis, Courtesy UW Special Collections (17465)

“There was an electric storm raging at the time of the avalanche. Lighting flashes were vivid and a tearing wind was howling down the canyon. Suddenly there was a dull roar, and the sleeping men and women felt the passenger coaches lifted and borne along. When the coaches reached the steep declivity they were rolled nearly 1,000 feet and buried under 40 feet of snow” (Roe, 87).
https://historylink.org/File/5127


Karen’s book:
Avalanche of Spirits: The Ghosts of Wellington

Avalanche of Spirits: The Ghosts of Wellington by [Frazier, Karen]


Avalanche of Spirits: The Ghosts of Wellington tells the true story of Karen Frazier’s experiences at the site of the biggest avalanche disaster in the history of the United States. At least 96 people died in that avalanche on March 1, 1910. Nearly 100 years later, friends took Karen to visit the site of the Wellington disaster. What she experienced there changed her life forever. Karen – and many others – have come to believe that spirits still remain in the town of Wellington.

Karen Frazier spent the summer and fall of 2009 visiting Wellington, researching the history of the avalanche and town, and interviewing people who have had unusual experiences there. Avalanche of Spirits: The Ghosts of Wellington is a unique combination of all three. Part historical account, part ghost story and part personal memoir, Karen weaves together the past and the present in a compelling story that will keep you spellbound.
Visit Karen Frazier’s Amazon Author Page for a complete list of her books: https://www.amazon.com/Karen-Frazier/e/B006C7MPIK

Wendy Lady’s Magick Studies \ Sept 18tH, 2019

9:00 pm Pacific, 11:00 pm Central, Midnight Eastern!


Listen Here:


Welcome to Wendy’s Magick Studies, a companion blog/podcast to Mystic Moon Café Radio. Once a week, probably late on Sundays, I will be presenting something magical, something mystical, and possibly movie and/or book reviews of Urban Fantasy, Magic, and so on.


Moon Magic – Folklore, History, Legend & Myth:
Since this is a companion article for Mystic Moon Café, I thought I would begin with a basic introduction to Moon Magic and the accompanying Lore. Please keep in mind that I am not a ‘practicing’ anything – except for snark-ologist – so this is pretty much academic, although I will try to include a few relevant spells and will attempt these spells myself whenever possible.


Facebook Event Here

Transcript of tonight’s show:

Wendy Lady’s Magickal Studies – Episode 1

Introduction:

Welcome to Wendy Lady’s Magickal Studies, a companion blog/podcast to Mystic Moon Café Radio.  Once a week, probably late on Sundays, I will be presenting something magical, something mystical, and possibly movie and/or book reviews of Urban Fantasy, Magic, and so on.

Now, I’m no expert in any of these things, but I know what I enjoy.  Research and Learning are at the top of my list.  I will be delving into one aspect of Magic, Witchcraft, Folklore, Myth and/or Legend in each article.

So, if you are so inclined, join me on this journey of discovery!

Pisces Full Moon September 13th/14th: Be Prepared To Have Your Faith Tested

Shall we start with a bit of Friday the 13th lore and such since this coming Friday is both September 13th and there is also a Full Moon?  Here’s everything to know about this year’s unique September full moon.

The moon is a wonder in all of its phases, but we seem to go a bit loony for her when she’s full. And this month, the full moon has a lot going on; enough to make all of us lunar fangirls and boys extra excitable. Consider the following:

1. It’s the harvest moon

The full moon closest in date to the autumnal equinox is awarded the title of harvest moon. Given the moon’s cycles, this means that harvest moons can happen as early as September 8 or as late as October 7. This year’s equinox falls on September 23, and thus the month’s full moon will wear the crown.

2. It will provide extra light

Because the harvest moon occurs when the orbit is more parallel to the horizon, its relationship to the eastern horizon stays close to the same for several days. This means that while usually the moon rises around 50 minutes later each night, the harvest moon rises just 25 to 30 minutes later across the northern U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe, according to NASA, which notes. While all full moons rise at sunset, the fact that the Harvest Moon has a shorter rising lag on successive days means that we get what appears to be a full moon rising near sunset for more days than usual; this gave farmers a “sunset extension” of sorts, which went to good use during the very busy time of harvest.

3. It’s full just for an instant

True of all full moons – although it may appear full for a few days, astronomically speaking, the moon is full at the moment that it’s exactly 180 degrees opposite the sun in ecliptic longitude. For this year’s harvest moon, that means it will be full for a fleeting moment at 4:33 Universal Time on September 14.

4. But for many the harvest moon coincides with Friday the 13th

For those of us in the Eastern time zone, the moon turns full at 12:33 a.m. on Saturday, September 14th – thereby depriving us of the spooky magic of such a mash-up. For the rest of the United States time zones, the moon becomes full officially before midnight on Friday the 13th.

(Bonus fact: Paraskevidekatriaphobia means a fear of Friday the 13th!)

5. A Friday the 13th full moon is relatively rare

We have not had a nationwide full moon on Friday the 13th since October 13th, 2000 – and won’t have another until August 13th, 2049.

6. It will also be a micromoon

Sure, supermoons get all the fanfare for their increased appearance in size … but let’s not ignore the adorable micro moon! This month’s full moon nearly coincides with apogee – the point in the moon’s orbit when it is farthest from Earth. The difference in moon-to-Earth distance between apogee and perigee is 30,000 miles. This difference in distance makes a supermoon look 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than a micromoon. We love underdogs, go little micromoon!

Source:  https://www.treehugger.com/natural-sciences/6-curiosities-about-rare-friday-13th-harvest-moon.html

MOON:  The Moon is Earth’s oldest temple, holding the potency of countless prayers since the dawn of Time…A bell whose ringing brings you into the field of the Mother, where body & soul can quietly drink..   Dana Gerhardt, Mooncircles

Moon Magic – Folklore, History, Legend & Myth:

Since this is a companion article for Mystic Moon Café, I thought I would begin with a basic introduction to Moon Magic and the accompanying History and Lore. Please keep in mind that I am not a ‘practicing’ anything – except for snark-ologist – so this is pretty much academic, although I will try to include a few relevant spells and will attempt these spells myself whenever possible.

So, here we go:

The Moon, in terms of distance, is the closest Heavenly body to Earth. It can be see it in the sky for three out of four weeks, and for thousands of years, people have used its light to guide them in the dark.

Since well before recorded history, the Moon has been the subject mystery and fascination, both worshipped and feared.  Perhaps, because of the Moon’s waxing and waning, she has garnered more mystical folklore than even the steady Sun. 

The Oldest Lunar Calendars and Earliest Constellations have been identified in cave art found in France and Germany. The astronomer-priests of these late Upper Paleolithic Cultures understood mathematical sets, and the interplay between the moon annual cycle, ecliptic, solstice and seasonal changes on earth.

The First (Lunar) Calendar
The archaeological record’s earliest data that speaks to human awareness of the stars and ‘heavens’ dates to the Aurignacian Culture of Europe, c.32,000 B.C. Between 1964 and the early 1990s, Alexander Marshack published breakthrough research that documented the mathematical and astronomical knowledge in the Late Upper Paleolithic Cultures of Europe. Marshack deciphered sets of marks carved into animal bones, and occasionally on the walls of caves, as records of the lunar cycle. These marks are sets of crescents or lines. Artisans carefully controlled line thickness so that a correlation with lunar phases would be as easy as possible to perceive. Sets of marks were often laid out in a serpentine pattern that suggests a snake deity or streams and rivers.


Aurignacian Lunar Calendar / diagram, drawing after Marshack, A. 1970; Notation dans les Gravures du Paléolithique Supérieur, Bordeaux, Delmas / Don’s Maps

Many of these lunar calendars were made on small pieces of stone, bone or antler so that they could be easily carried. These small, portable, lightweight lunar calendars were easily carried on extended journeys such as long hunting trips and seasonal migrations.

Hunting the largest animals was arduous, and might require hunters to follow herds of horses, bison, mammoth or ibex for many weeks. (Other big animals such as the auroch, cave bear and cave lion were well known but rarely hunted for food because they had special status in the mythic realm. The Auroch is very important to the search for earliest constellations.)   Info from:  https://sservi.nasa.gov/articles/oldest-lunar-calendars/

THE MOON IN ANCIENT HISTORY https://www.moonlightsys.com/themoon/ancient2.html

(Ancient Astronomical Calendars)

The Sun, Moon, planets, and stars have provided us a reference for measuring the passage of time throughout history. All cultures before recorded history charted the heavenly skies to make some sort of sense out of their environment.
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Ancient Mayan Calendar

Astronomical calendars have been in existence for thousands of years. For our ancient ancestor’s time was measured by the number of Moons that had passed from a certain period, and by the shadows that the Sun and Moon cast.

There are “Man made” lunar calendars that some scientists place as old as 32,000 years. Some recent archeological findings are from the Ice Age where hunters carved notches and gouged holes into sticks, reindeer bones and the tusks of mammoths, depicting the days between each phase of the Moon. These artifacts are dated between 25,000 and 10,000 B.C. There are also surviving astronomical records inscribed on oracle bones dating back to the Shang dynasty of the fourteenth century B.C. that reveal a Chinese calendar, with intercalation of lunar months.

            The Sun, Moon, planets, and stars have provided us a reference for measuring the passage of time throughout history. All cultures before recorded history charted the heavenly skies to make some sort of sense out of their environment.

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Ancient Egyptian Calendar

In Egypt, the paths of the stars were recorded as early as 6,000 years before Christ. The wisest of the Egyptians were the Hermetic philosophers, who possessed a profound knowledge of the sky. They relied upon the predictable motion of these bodies through the sky to determine the seasons, months, and years. People began a preoccupation with measuring and recording the passage of time. There was a need for planning and for divination and prognostication; to maintain these cycles meant that records needed to be kept and observatories needed to be built to precisely measure these cycles.

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Ancient Chinese Calendar

They erected various calendars to provide a source of order and cultural identity and as a need to organize their time more efficiently. As far back as 5,000 to 6,000 years ago civilizations in the Middle East and North Africa also made primitive clocks in order to divide their time more precisely. Of primary importance to the Egyptians was the time when the Nile river began its annual flood tide. This was carefully noted so they knew when to plant and harvest.

All of their activities, whether for work, rest or play were in harmony with the flow of “Mother Nature,” the changing of seasons, the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon and the phases the Moon passed through in a month. There was a time for everything under the Heavens! The seasons, tides, eclipses, and phases of the Moon were known to be in direct correlation to the movement of the Sun, Moon, and Earth.

Clocks and Calendars traditionally held a sacred status among diversified cultures and provided the basis for maintaining the cycles of religious and civil events, as well as for agricultural and hunting purposes. These early calendars are based on the Moon’s cycles.

Ancient time keepers were usually Sages, Magi, or astrologer-priests who guarded the sacred records in their rock temples in India, on their ziggurats in Babylonia or their stone observatories and pyramids in Egypt. They calculated that a month was the period the Moon revolved around the Earth, and from this understanding various Lunar Calendars evolved. Until the time of Julius Caesar, the calendar was primarily lunar, with various schemes devised to keep step with the cycle of seasons. When measured in this fashion, lives ebbed and flowed in a 29.53059 day cycle.

Magic. The Occult, Astrology, Alchemy, Prophecy, Fortune Telling, Spells and Superstition

The Moon plays a large and complex part in magic and the occult. This is a comprehensive history of the moon’s importance in the worlds of astrology, alchemy, prophecy and superstition.

A Brief History of the Moon and Astrology

The Moon’s place in the astrological world starts in about 4000 BC with the Sumerians who worshipped the god of the Sun (Utu), Venus (Inanna) and the Moon (Nanna). Their rulers came from the priest who communicated with these gods. A special sort of priest emerged called Banu Priests who could read the signs of the sky. These priests were predicting natural phenomena, usually an eclipse of the moon.

The moon is an essential element in the most important text relating to alchemy. That text is known as the Emerald Tablet:

The Emerald Tablet drawn by Heinrich Khunrath, 1606

The Emerald Tablet has several other names: the Smaragdine Tablet, the Tabula Smaragdine and the Secret of Hermes. It is an ancient text said to have been produced by the Egyptian moon god Thoth, who is also referred to as Hermes Trismegistus. The short and highly cryptic piece of writing claims to describe the secrets of the primordial substance and how it can be harnessed. The tablet’s meaning is very obscure. It seems to state that all things come from some primal source of which the sun is the father and the moon is the mother:

‘Its father is the Sun, its mother the Moon, the wind carried it in its belly and its nurse is the earth.’

The Ancient Egyptians worshipped her as the Mother of the Universe, and in Central Asia, she is the Goddess’s mirror, reflecting everything in the World. 

In the Basque language, “Moon” and “Deity” are the same word – Ilargi, Ile or Ilazki. In Basque mythology, she is the daughter of Mother Earth, to whom it returns daily..

Britain’s old name is ‘Albion’, meaning “the Milk-White Moon Goddess.”

To the Persians, the Moon was ‘Metra’ – “Mother, whose love penetrates everywhere.”

The Vedas, sacred texts for Hindus, say that the Moon is a receptacle of souls between incarnations.

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The Catholic Church’s Mary is closely associated with the Moon. Early paintings depict her standing on a crescent Moon.

It is unlikely that any civilization, ancient and modern, has not been influenced in some way by the Moon’s magic.

Outside of religion and spiritual beliefs, a rich folklore about the Moon developed among common people in Europe. It was believed that:

  •  At the moment you see a new Moon, jingle coins in your pocket. This is a sure way to multiply your fortune as the Moon waxes.
  • Never start a project during the waning Moon, it will not be successful.
  • A woman who sleeps in the Moonlight increases her fertility.
  • The New Moon is good luck but should never be looked at through glass or tree branches.
  • After seeing the Moon for the first time in a new year, ask a question of the first person you see. If the answer is “yes,” you will marry your love.
  • A pregnant woman should never face the Moon; her child will be born with mental problems. To stop this, she must turn in a counterclockwise circle three times and spit.

Seems a bit fantastical, but Folklore and Superstition are quite often that way.

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Gypsy Moon Lore

The word lunatic comes from the Latin ‘Luna’, and it was believed that people were more likely to exhibit aberrant, crazy behavior during a full moon. Studies have been done which show that emergency room visits and accidents are increased during the full moon period, but there has yet to be conclusive evidence for the cause 

Folk magic involving the Moon could fill pages and pages. How much of this is based on real magic and how much is mere superstition? Surprisingly, a lot of Moon lore and magic holds true power. One “superstition” about the Moon is that emotions become unstable during the full and new Moons. The Moon has been credited with lunacy for centuries. Paracelus, a 14th century alchemist and physician, claimed that insanity grew worse during the dark of the Moon. Before 1808, some mental hospitals routinely had patients beaten during certain lunar phases. This was to prevent outbursts of lunacy..

The moon seems to have an effect on animals as well as people. Dr. Frank Brown of Northwestern University, an expert on animal behavior, reports that hamsters spin in their wheels far more aggressively during the moon’s full phase. Deer and other herbivores in the wild tend to ovulate at the full moon, and in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the full moon is mating time for coral.

The Strange Case of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson, was inspired by the strange – and yet very true – case of Charles Hyde, a London man who committed a series of crimes at the time of the full moon.

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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde DeviantArt

A British legend says that if Christmas fell on the day of a dark Moon, the following year’s harvest would be a bountiful one. Some parts of the British Isles believed that a waxing moon on Christmas meant a good crop the next fall, but a waning moon indicated a bad one would come.

From a folklore standpoint, many traditions of weather magic indicate that a lunar halo means rain, snow, or other types of foul atmospheric conditions are on the way. Related to the lunar halo is the phenomenon called a moonbow. Interestingly, because of the way light refracts, a moonbow – which is just like a rainbow, but appearing at night – will only be seen in the part of the sky opposite of where the moon is visible.

Other Lunar Superstitions

•     The first time you see a crescent moon for the month, take all your spare coins out of your pocket, and put them in the other pocket. This will ensure good luck for the next month.

•     Some people believe that the fifth day after a full moon is the perfect time to try to conceive a child.

•     Many cultures throughout history have honored lunar deities, including Artemis, Selene, and Thoth.

•     In some Chinese religions, offerings are made to the ancestors on the night of a full moon.

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•     In some Native American legends, the moon is held captive by a hostile tribe. A pair of antelope hope to rescue the moon and take it the village of a good tribe, but Coyote, the trickster, interferes. The antelope chase Coyote, who tosses the moon into a river each night, just out of reach of the antelope.

•     The night of the full moon is believed to be a good time for divination and scrying.

In addition, there has been a long-standing agricultural tradition regarding planting by the moon phases. Martha White over at The Old Farmer’s Almanac writes,

“The new and first-quarter phases, known as the light of the Moon, are considered good for planting above-ground crops, putting down sod, grafting trees, and transplanting. From full Moon through the last quarter, or the dark of the Moon, is the best time for killing weeds, thinning, pruning, mowing, cutting timber, and planting below-ground crops.”

Most every farmer knows that roots are supposed to grow best when planted during the dark of the Moon, and plants with edible parts above ground grow better when planted in the waxing Moon. A quick search in the internet will bring hundreds of sites on planting by the Moon. Many farmers—commercial and backyard —swear by the Moon method

Many pre-Christian lunar worship rites and rituals have carried over into modern times. These have long lost their original meanings but are nevertheless still practiced. The use of birthday candles and cakes is a good example. This tradition comes to us from the ancient Greeks. To honor the birthday of Artemis, goddess of the Moon, lunar-shaped cakes with candles were placed on her altar. Blowing out the candles and making a wish is a remnant of prayers offered to Artemis

Weather and the Moon

The Moon’s role in weather patterns has some interesting folk magic. When the crescent Moon lies on its back, with horns up, a drought is thought to be inevitable. When it is vertical, like the letter “C,” rain is on its way. A long drought is expected if the Moon hovers low on the southern horizon. A ring around the Moon is supposed to bring heavy rain or snow. Counting the number of stars in the ring tells how far away the storm is. No stars bring the storm within a day.

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These indications may seem like superstition, but the Moon does affect weather. During its waxing phase, the Moon affects the earth’s magnetic field and may trigger thunderstorms. Reports from over 1500 weather stations during a 50 year period show heavy rainfall occurs more often in North America during the 2nd, and 4th quarters of the lunar cycle than during the other phases

At the site, History.com, there is a great article that looks at even more obscure and less mainstreem myths, including the ideas that aliens inhabit the moon, that the moon is actually a hollow spacecraft, or that there was a secret Nazi base there during World War II.

Fear of the Moon

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Moon Demon

People of ancient times often feared the moon. The Aleutians thought that if anyone offended the Moon, it would fling stones down at the offender and kill him. The Hakkas believed that, if on the 15th day of the 8th month, clouds covered the moon before midnight, oil and salt would soon be scarce. The Chaldeans, close observers of eclipses, believed that when the Moon was obscured, she had turned her back on earth. Many Native American’s believed that eclipses were caused by a serpent swallowing the Moon. Hindus explained an eclipse by describing a giant who grabbed the luminaries and tried to eat them. The Chinese had a similar belief, but a dragon instead of a giant grabbed the Moon for a tasty meal.

Some ancient peoples tried to help the Moon escape the monster’s clutches by shouting and making loud noises with musical instruments. This would supposedly frighten the beast away. And since the Moon always reappeared, they naturally believed their din had indeed frightened the monster and saved the Moon.

Moon Magic

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For many Pagans, the cycles of the moon are important to magical workings. It’s believed in some traditions that the waxing moon, the full moon, the waning moon and the new moon all have their own special magical properties, and so workings should be planned accordingly.

The full moon has long had an aura of mystery and magic about it. It is tied to the ebbs and flows of the tide, as well as the every-changing cycle of women’s bodies. The moon is connected to our wisdom and intuition, and many Pagans and Wiccans choose to celebrate the full moon with a monthly ritual.

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If you’re starting your path to become a Witch, one key element that can determine your success when casting spells at home is your ability to keep track of the moon phases and work with them to improve your ritual Magic. The first thing is to be aware of what the Moon phase is today.

Today, September 8th, 2019, has a First Quarter Moon/Moon in Capricorn

Current Moon Phase

First Quarter Moon

Moon in Capricorn

For Moon Phases for each day:  https://spells8.com/lessons/moon-phases-spells/

Courtesy of :  https://spells8.com/spell-for-today/

Ritual for Tonight’s Magic

  1. Light some incense to help you set the mood. The best aromas for tonight are: Musk, Frankincense, Lemon, or Citrus.
  2. As the Moon is passing through Capricorn, invite Her energies with this chant:

    “Thank you, Dear Moon, for uniting me to the stability and practicality of the Goat.
    Just like her, I am ambitious and determined to achieve my goals”.
  3. Take a piece of paper. Write in clear letters your deepest wish. Don’t overthink. Instead, just start writing. Visualize your idea of a perfect future and write it down in the present tense. The First Quarter Moon is a time of abundance and growth, so think BIG! Be clear and precise, whether it’s a love request, a money target, or just a dream to work towards.
  4. Light a white candle on your altar. Place it next to your petition and leave it there.
  5. Place on your altar any crystals that you would like to charge with the energies of tonight. Especially sensitive gemstones for a Sunday are: Amber, Carnelian, Diamond, Tiger’s Eye Quartz.
  6. Meditate for a while. Then take the paper and paste it in your diary, Book of Shadows, or hide it in a secret place.

More Spells for Tonight’s First Quarter Moon

Cast these spells during a First Quarter moon:

Info and spells above via: https://spells8.com/spell-for-today/

Drawing down the Moon

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drawing_down_the_Moon_

Drawing down the Moon (also known as drawing down the Goddess) is a central ritual in many contemporary Wiccan traditions. During the ritual, a coven’s High Priestess enters a trance and requests that the Goddess or Triple Goddess, symbolized by the Moon, enter her body and speak through her. The High Priestess may be aided by the High Priest, who invokes the spirit of the Goddess. During her trance, the Goddess speaks through the High Priestess.

History

The name most likely comes from a depiction of two women and the moon on an ancient Greek vase, believed to date from the second century BCE.

It could also come from line 145 of Claudian’s First Book Against Rufinus. Megaera, one of the Erinyes, in the guise of an old man, speaks to Rufinus:

Despise not an old man’s feeble limbs: I have the gift of magic and the fire of prophecy is within me. I have learned the incantations wherewith Thessalian witches pull down the bright moon, I know the meaning of the wise Egyptians’ runes, the art whereby the Chaldeans impose their will upon the subject gods, the various saps that flow within trees and the power of deadly herbs; all those that grow on Caucasus rich in poisonous plants, or, to man’s bane, clothe the crags of Scythia; herbs such as cruel Medea gathered and curious Circe.

In classical times, ancient Thessalian witches were believed to control the moon, according to the tract: “If I command the moon, it will come down; and if I wish to withhold the day, night will linger over my head; and again, if I wish to embark on the sea, I need no ship, and if I wish to fly through the air, I am free from my weight.”

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Circe changing Picus into a bird

The drawing down of the moon derives from the Vangelo. In this a poem defining the drawing down of the moon is written and this has been used as the basis for the drawing down of the moon by various Wiccan groups. The practice forms part of both Gardnerian and Cochranian rites. The practice is also reference in Reginald Scot’s “The Discoverie of Witchcraft”.

The modern form likely originated in Gardnerian Wicca, and is considered a central element of Gardnerian and Alexandrian Wiccan ceremonies. During the modern rite, the High Priestess may recite the Charge of the Goddess, a text based in a mixture of writings by Gerald Gardner and Aleister Crowley, though now often used in its recension by Doreen Valiente, High Priestess in the Gardnerian tradition.

Mel D. Faber explains the ritual in psychoanalytical terms of attempting to re-unite with the protective-mother archetype.

In modern traditions, some solitary Wiccans also perform the ritual, usually within a circle and performed under the light of a full Moon. The solitary will stand in the Goddess Pose (both arms held high, palms up, body and arms forming a ‘Y’) and recite a charge, or chant.

The ritual in print:  “Drawing Down the Moon” is also the title of a book by National Public Radio reporter, Margot Adler— Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America Today—originally published in 1979. Adler writes:

…in this ritual, one of the most serious and beautiful in the modern Craft, the priest invokes into the priestess (or, depending on your point of view, she evokes from within herself) the Goddess or Triple Goddess, symbolized by the phases of the moon. She is known by a thousand names, and among them were those I had used as a child. In some Craft rituals the priestess goes into a trance and speaks; in other traditions the ritual is a more formal dramatic dialogue, often of intense beauty, in which, again, the priestess speaks, taking the role of the Goddess. In both instances, the priestess functions as the Goddess incarnate, within the circle.

A very good resource:  https://www.moonology.com/

So, the more attuned one is with the Moon, the more easily Life and it’s surrounding circumstances can flow.

I’m going to stop here. What was supposed to be a short article has turned into a 4000+ word essay.

Upcoming Sabbat:  Mabon

the autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere, the point after which the nights become longer than the days, as the North Pole tilts away from the sun. … In pagan mythology, the equinox is called Mabon, or Second Harvest. It is a time to give thanks for the summer and to pay tribute to the coming darkness.

I want to wish you Luck in your Magickal pursuits. I hope you found this interesting and helpful. I know I did.

WendyLady

Website: https://www.mysticmooncafe.com
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Some sites I borrowed information from:

https://www.learnreligions.com/lunar-folklore-2562381

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